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Features  123456


MARKETS
At OLEX, veal is selling on a steady basis.
TRADE
U.S. Senate tinkers with trade deal
EVENTS
Maple Syrup Weekend is April 6 and 7
BUSINESS
Roger Massicotte becomes president of Agropur
ENVIRONMENT
Grand River plan open for comment

Bulgaria finds more African Swine Fever

February 14, 2019 - Officials in Bulgaria Thursday confirmed the presence of African swine fever (ASF) in wild boar.
In August Bulgaria reported its first outbreak of African swine fever among backyard pigs in Tutrakantsi, close to the border with Romania.
Seven infected animals were found at one farm in the northeastern village of Tutrakantsi and tests confirmed the virus, the Bulgarian Food Safety Agency said. All 23 pigs in the village were culled and a three-kilometre quarantine zone was established around the village.
Six months ago Bulgaria erected a fence in an attempt to prevent the crossing of potentially infected wild boars from bringing the disease into Bulgarian territory.

PED hits Bruce County finisher

February 14, 2019 - Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea virus has hit a finishing operation in Bruce County
It is the 120th case in the province and the second this month. On Feb. 1 a finishing operation in the Waterloo Region came down with the virus and on Jan. 25 a finishing barn in Oxford County.
Winter weather leads to higher virus survival and therefore a greater risk that it will spread.
The continued spread of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea virus is worrisome because it indicates that the industry’s biosecurity measures are inadequate. That is doubly worrisome in the face of the spread of African Swine Fever, a much more deadly and contagious disease, in China and Eastern Europe.

Flinton packer suspended

February 14, 2019 - Flintshire Farms Inc. of Flinton, Ont. has had its federal licence suspended by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.
The CFIA said on its website that Flintshire repeatedly failed to meet standards.
Flinton is in Lennox-Addington in Eastern Ontario.
The CFIA also suspended the licence of Omega Fish Foods of Calgary for failure to meet standards for labelling and maintaining records.

Feds offer $50.3 million

February 14, 2019 - Federal Agriculture Minister Lawrence MacAulay chose Agriculture Day to announce the new Canadian Agricultural Strategic Priorities Program (CASPP).
He said $50.3 million will be on offer over five years.
“Funding available through this program will help facilitate the sector's ability to address emerging issues and capitalize on opportunities,” he said via a news release.

 

Japan has African Swine Fever

February 14, 2019 - African Swine Fever has broken out in two prefectures in Japan, prompting the cull of 15,000 pigs.
Officials say the strain involved differs from the strain wreaking havoc in China.
The outbreaks began in Aichi and spread to Gifu prefecture. They also identified the disease in pigs shipped from Aichi in Central Japan to Osaka.
It is the first outbreak in Japan in 26 years.

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Sows have most antibiotic-resistant genes

February 11, 2019 - Chinese researchers have found that antibiotic-resistant genes vary among pigs at different stages of growth and that sows have the most
Suckling piglets are next.
The study is part of an ongoing effort to reduce antibiotic resistance.
The authors of the paper, Junya Zhang, Tiedong Lu, Yufeng Chai, Qianwen Sui, Peihong Shen, Yuansong Wei, ran the study. The results were published in the journal, Science of The Total Environment.

Brucellosis found in raw milk

February 11, 2019 - The United StatesS. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and state health officials are investigating potential exposures to Brucella strain RB51 (RB51) in 19 states where people drank raw milk.
The milk was from Miller’s Biodiversity Farm in Quarryville, Pennsylvania.
One case of RB51 infection (brucellosis) has been confirmed in New York, and an unknown number of people may have been exposed to RB51 from drinking the milk from this farm, the Centre said
“This type of Brucella is resistant to first-line drugs and can be difficult to diagnose because of limited testing options and the fact that early brucellosis symptoms are similar to those of more common illnesses like flu,” the Centre said.
The New York case is the third known instance of an infection with RB51 associated with consuming raw milk or raw milk products produced in the United States. The other two human cases occurred in October, 2017, in New Jersey and in August, 2017,  in Texas.
In addition to these three confirmed cases, hundreds of others were potentially exposed to RB51 during these three incidents, the Centre said.
“RB51 is a live, weakened strain used in a vaccine to protect cows against a more severe form of Brucella infection that can cause abortions in cows and severe illness in people.
“On rare occasions, cows vaccinated with RB51 vaccine can shed the bacteria in their milk.
“People who drink raw milk from cows that are shedding RB51 can develop brucellosis,” said the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.