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MARKETS
Replacements traded mostly steady to slightly lower on some types.
BEEF NEWS
http://mag.gallery.siteseer.ca/cache/derivative/1/9/19473.dat
BEEF
BFO requests voluntary price reporting.
PESTS
One million for pest-tracking company
NEWS
Ginseng buyer vanishes


CCA promotes CETA in Europe

April 27, 2016 - CCA President Dan Darling was  in Brussels, Belgium last week accompanying International Trade Minister Chrystia Freeland in promoting Canada-EU Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA).
The Minister’s mission provided an opportunity to highlight the need to resolve important technical issues for Canada’s beef exporters in order for the sector to realize the full potential of the deal’s trade benefits.
With the quota access provided by CETA, Canadian beef exports to Europe could grow to $600 million a year from today’s $10 million by eliminating tariffs for nearly 65,000 tonnes of Canadian beef a year, said Darling, who runs a cow-calf and backgrounding operation in Ontario
However, CCA is concerned Canada’s ability to fill the beef export demand may be hindered by unresolved technical issues.
The most significant issue is the fact that the EU has not yet approved all of the procedures used in Canadian beef production to ensure food safety. For example, Canada reduces the potential presence of harmful bacteria in meat production by using antimicrobial carcass rinses.
The most commonly used antimicrobial rinses are lactic acid, citric acid, and peroxyacetic acid (PAA)-based solutions diluted in water. Europe has recently approved lactic acid and recycled hot water. Review of the scientific data on the efficacy of citric acid and PAA by European authorities will follow, but resolving such matters is critical to achieve genuine trade benefits. 

Pork, beef propel U.S. red meat output higher

April 28, 2016 - Record high U.S. pork production in March moved overall red meat output higher compared to a year ago, the latest USDA report shows.
Total U.S. production was pegged at 4.26 billion pounds, five per cent more than in March 2015.
Pork production topped last year’s output by two per cent at 2.15 billion pounds. Hog slaughter numbers were two per cent higher while the average live weight stayed virtually the same.
Beef production was eight per cent higher at 2.10
billion pounds, the result of a six per cent increase in slaughter numbers and a 23 pound increase in the average live weight.
Veal production totaled 6.4 million pounds, down eight per cent from last March as farmers sent 10 per cent fewer calves for slaughter.
Lamb and mutton production was down slightly at 14.3 million pounds.
Total U.S. red meat production was the first three months of the year was 12.2 billion pounds, a three per cent increase over 2015. Beef production is up five per cent so far, while veal is down four per cent, pork as well as lamb and mutton up one percentage point.